Commitment Issues? Hire an Athlete!

The Canada Winter Games, held in Prince George. B.C. this past February, brought together a collection of Canada’s finest Junior Athletes across a multitude of sports. Individual athletes and teams competed to attain personal bests and medal achievements for their provincial organizations. For some, these Games would bring them one step closer to possibly representing their country at the next Olympics. From the start of the Opening Ceremonies, to the daily meals in the dining hall, to the conversations heard at the Athletes Village, Prince George was a bevy of excitement, pride and positive energy that everyone could feel – including the local residents and volunteers. Each training day and each competitive event was evidence of not simply the best of the best on display, but of the many hours, determination and dedication needed to get each and every athlete to that point.

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Smile! You're on Camera

Human resources, IT must team up on workplace surveillance

 

Human resources and talent management has always been an evolving industry sector. Today, word is our baby boomers are finally leaving the workplace while Generation X and the millennials are taking over.

 

Yet, at the same time, there are just as many baby boomers who are either staying or returning to the workplace.

The dilemma for HR professionals is how to manage the personal and professional interests of all these generations.

Technological advances have also significantly changed the way we work and how we manage. In fact, without technology, we shut down.

We recruit our candidates through websites and social media. We train our employees through online portals and assess them through online 360-degree feedback. We easily participate in team meetings with colleagues in foreign countries.

Technology has also enabled management to become strategic partners in business planning as we now use data and analytics to discover organizational trends, determine areas for improvement and project future HR needs. Technology has increased our ability to supervise, manage and protect employees. For instance, security cameras are now widely used to protect both workplaces and employees. As well, management can now monitor work through examining an employee's keystrokes, observing and tracking their online activity and capturing an individual's email and text messages. On some occasions, although not well received, employees have received their termination notices through email.

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Finding a New Horizon in the Retention of Older Workers

In my view, there are two colliding trends in today’s business world that we need to start paying attention to. First, we know that the pool of younger, highly qualified and experienced candidates for succession to senior leadership positions is continuing to shrink. And secondly, we know that the average median age for retirement is now 63.3 years. Thus, with the number of individuals’ right on this age cusp, businesses are at risk of losing a lot of intellectual capital. We need do to something to keep these experienced senior professionals just a little bit longer while at the same time, developing younger professionals.

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Giving & Receiving - It is as Simple as That!

In April we are reminded that the filing of our personal taxes are due by the end of the month.  Although this does not often have a favorable connotation to it, along with all the many slips we need, we also collect all of our charitable receipts with pride and can assess, through an actual numerical figure, how giving we truly were this past tax year.

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Managers Need to Lead By Example

Almost every manager I speak to talks about the amount of time they spend on human resource issues. Some even feel overwhelmed. Unfortunately, most of the issues relate to interpersonal conflict between employees, bullying, blaming, poor performance, job dissatisfaction, gossip, complaints and whiney attitudes.

 

According to Cy Wakeman, author of Reality Based Leadership, and the keynote speaker at the upcoming QNET conference, part of the challenge is that many employees have adopted learned helplessness both in their personal and professional lives. In her view, employees are feeling they lack control and have an inability to change their circumstances. This results in negative attitudes and presents a problem for leaders.

In her view, the fault lies with leaders who over-manage and don't lead instead of coaching employees and developing their skills and expertise. When a leader acts in such a way, all they get from employees is excuses. This leads to even more workplace drama.

So what is the solution?

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